Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Ye Olde Banana Bread

I have this lovely old cookbook, it's The Boston School of Cooking cookbook (which is also known by it's author's name, Fannie Farmer) that was my great aunt's.  There are some kind of bizarre, dated recipes in it, but mostly it's just the basics. 





















As you can (maybe) see, there are significantly fewer directions than there are in modern cookbooks.  I think that it was assumed that you had a basic understanding of how to turn on the stove and chop things.  I think it's interesting to look at things like this and ponder how much life has changed.  As an aside, if anyone has a life...I apparently need to get one, so hit me up.

Anyways, this banana bread was tasty, although a little different than others that I've made.  There is no applesauce or oil in it, so it's denser than what I've made in the past.  It was good, just a little different texture than what I'm used to. 





















Banana Bread:
3 Brown Bananas (They get better the older they are, because they mush more easily and they're sweeter.  So don't throw away old bananas, stick them in the freezer.)
2 Eggs
2 Cups Flour
3/4 Cup Sugar
1 Teaspoon Salt
1 Teaspoon Baking Soda
The recipe called for nuts (actually "chopped nut meats"), but I didn't have any and I was planning to take to a friend's house, and he's allergic to nuts.  Seems rude to take food to some one's home that they can't even eat. 

Pre-heat the oven to 325.  Remove the bananas from their skin.


























Mash them up with a fork.  This shouldn't take a lot of effort, because they are already mushy.  Also, if you have little ones, kids freakin LOVE this.  I think it's the potential for mess.


























Beat the eggs in a small bowl and add to the bananas.





















Next, add the sugar, flour, salt, and baking soda to the bowl.  Stir to combine.



























Put it into a WELL GREASED pan.  It will stick like crazy if you don't really make sure to get the whole thing covered in your grease of choice (I use Pam Baking Spray, but the Shaw's brand because it's cheaper).





















Bake for about an hour, you'll know it's done when your house smells nice and you stick a fork in the middle and the fork comes out clean.






















I like to wait 5-10 minutes before taking it out of the pan; it seems to come out more easily that way and it's easier to handle because it isn't quite as hot.  Serve as is, or toasted with some peanut butter, cream cheese, or nutella. 

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